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employment law Archives

Employment law can help protect new mothers

Balancing work and motherhood is an ongoing battle for many American women. Many women have to work to support their families and so return to work in Tennessee as soon as they are physically able. In a recent case in another state a woman is suing her employer for failing to accommodate her needs as a nursing mother. Recent changes in employment law can further protect nursing mothers.

Employment law exists to protect rights of all workers in America

There is one group of American citizens in Tennessee who hope that the outcome of the midterm elections will result in a benefit for them that will help them in the workplace. Muslim-American women are subject to employment discrimination because of the hijab, or head coverings, they wear as part of their religious practice. Discrimination based on religion is a violation of employment law. Two Muslim-American women were elected to U.S. Congress in November. One of their goals is to pass a religious exemption for the 180-year-old law that prohibits wearing hats on the floor of the House of Representatives.

Employment law does not apply to all

Most workers in Tennessee and around the country are protected from workplace discrimination issues such as age, race religion and gender. However, there is a large group of workers who are not protected by employment law. That group is made up of the independent contractors, freelance workers and other contract workers who makeup an estimated 15 to 30 percent of the American workforce.

Employment law does not allow for age discrimination

Americans are staying healthier longer in Tennessee, and some are choosing to work longer. Some people may wish to return to work when children leave home or simply to bring in some extra money, or even to avoid being bored. Whatever the reason, employers cannot refuse to hire a qualified applicant because of one's age. Employment law prohibits such discrimination.

Racism continues to be an employment law concern in 2018

The year is 2018 and sadly racism is alive and well in Tennessee. While employees occasionally suffer discrimination from their employers, they may also experience it coming from customers. Employment law protects employees from workplace discrimination.

Employment law does not allow age discrimination

A person in Tennessee who has been performing a job successfully should not have to stop performing that job just because of his or her age. Age discrimination is illegal in the United States, and so is a violation of employment law. Age discrimination is also a violation of the Tennessee Human Rights Act.

Age discrimination is a violation of employment law

Equal opportunity employment should mean just what it sounds like in Tennessee. If a person is qualified and physically able to do a job, the individual should have the opportunity to demonstrate that he or she can do the job. However, in a case recently brought against a fast food chain, it appears that age may be being used as a disqualifier, which is in violation of employment law.

Former communications director argues wrongful termination

Most people in Tennessee report to work each day, dedicated to performing their job responsibilities to the best of their ability. Unfortunately, there are certain situations in the workplace that could prevent them or make them feel uncomfortable while doing so, prompting them to take action. However, a woman in another state claims that her attempts to do just that resulted in her wrongful termination.

Immigrants invoke employment law to help recover unpaid wages

All employees have rights in the workplace. These rights help to protect the workers and also the employers. Employment law claims may be appropriate when these rights are violated. One Tennessee business owner is finding herself defending a lawsuit brought by former employees who claim she ran her business like a sweatshop.

Using social media to fire employees could violate employment law

With the increased access to social media platforms, it has come as no surprise that many employees are learning about the loss of a job from their mobile apps rather than from their employers. In Tennessee, one woman learned through the co-worker grapevine that she had lost her job, but she did not receive verbal confirmation from her former employer. Employment law stipulates how the release from one's job duties is to be carried out, and the use of social media platforms is not the way to go.

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