Most people in Tennessee do not expect to lose their job as a result of standing up for what is right. For example, the decision to support a co-worker as she pursues sexual discrimination claims against the CEO of the company should not be grounds for termination. In a recent employment law case, a woman in another state claims that she was the victim of such action.

According to the lawsuit, the plaintiff began working in 2011 for Aspira Inc, a Latino company that operates out-of-state charter schools. While she was reportedly hired as the curriculum director, she claims that she was awarded several promotions and was praised for her work. The suit alleges that her situation changed in Nov. 2014 when she aided another co-worker in her sexual harassment allegations against the CEO.

Afterward, she claims that her job responsibilities were reduced and she was excluded from meetings. She even claims that the board’s treasurer confronted her husband, informing him that “heads would roll” over support of the sexual harassment claims. In May 2015, she filed a discrimination claim with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and she was informed that her contract would not be removed a month later.

Although Aspira reportedly told her that her contract was not being renewed due to restructuring, she claims that people in similar positions who had not supported the harassment claims remained employed. Aspira officials deny the allegations of the lawsuit, with the superintendent of the school claiming he made the termination decision based on merit. Unfortunately, cases involves accusations related to employment law are often complex. Those who are victims of wrongful termination in Tennessee benefit from the guidance of an experienced attorney as they decide on the most appropriate response following such an incident.

Source: philly.com, “Former academic leader sues Aspira, says she lost job for backing sexual harassment claim“, Martha Woodall, Sept. 1, 2017