As an older motorcycle rider, you probably feel younger than you are when you take your bike out for a spin on the open road. Being part of the sixty-and-over crowd, you enjoy the camaraderie of other motorcyclists of your generation who feel the same way.

Life is laid-back at this stage, and you look forward to new adventures with your motorcycle. However, you may be beginning to realize there are certain limitations to your riding ability, and they have to do with the aging process.

Fewer accidents, more injuries

Older motorcyclists are in far fewer crashes than their younger counterparts, but compared to riders in their 20s and 30s, senior bikers are three times more likely to suffer severe injuries. A report published in a medical journal found the physiological effects of aging play a part in these injuries.

As you grow older, changes take place over which you have little control. For example, bone strength decreases and there is a reduction of elasticity in the chest wall. Along with broken bones, head and chest injuries are very common among older riders because of this. In addition, you do not enter the so-called “golden years” without accumulating a complex medical history, and pre-existing conditions can impact your ability to recover from any accident-related injuries you might suffer.

Reaction time changes

You may be a seasoned motorcycle rider, but you cannot stop the aging process. As the years go by, you must be cognizant of a slow-down in reaction time; your reflexes simply will not operate as quickly as they once did. This issue, plus your worsening vision, may also prevent you from seeing and reacting to a collision that is about to happen. 

Pinning the blame

Despite your age and any physiological problems that may exist, the fault for a crash may well lie with the other party. Your best bet is to depend on professionals to handle the legal aspects of the accident so you can concentrate your efforts on getting your health back — and getting back on the open road.